Traditional vs cavitation profusion infusion - review of a bar above episode

Well - it is not exactly a review of the episode, but rather a discussion. Just first of all watch the episode below:




So - which techniques is really better?

Unfortunately Chris left a couple of points out of the equation (at least in the video): 
  • You can cut leaves, which result into a much better infusion - but might also have a major impact in the color - the smaller the botanicals, the more concentrated the solution - and for the lemon, you really need to zest or use very thin strips of lemon, to have a big impact.
  • Time - the infusion time is ample. But the liquid even infuses, after it is strained. When was the testing done?
  • Temperature - room temperature works just best. Fridge temperature works obviously not good at all.
  • The quantity of the botanicals - while the time honored method takes much longer, the quantity of the botanicals are not as important as in the profusion method. 
  • But most important: cavitation infusion works with some ingredients better, than with others. Especially well are "profusions" which are made with very delicate botanicals, which are either way heat sensitive and or changing very much their taste while macerating.
    For example, mint infusions, are tasting woody and odd, when infused too long - or they taste like tea, if heat is applied. To make a mint julep with the cavitation profusion technique is the only way, how to get it perfectly fresh minty with all the delicacy mint should have in a julep.
More tests for this technique is definitely needed. I was also pretty much amazed by the idea of the technique - but then let down by my practical results. 
Like always, there is no one fits all technique - you have to apply different techniques to different situations.


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