Skip to main content

Modified Wines

We tried today the modified wines from the new Skylite menu, and I have to say, the idea was a strike of geniality.

We tried to boost the typical varietal characters of 4 different wines:

  • a chardonnay - which is rather balanced with lesser acidity and some poached pip fruit aromas - we infused this with roasted coconut, poached pears and vanilla
  • a sauvignon blanc - which is acidic, sports greenish exotic fruits - we infused with passion fruit, rock melon and lime zest
  • a merlot - which is round and mellow and has some berry aromas - we infused with raspberries, blueberries and vanilla
  • a cabernet sauvignon - which is spicier and rich - we infused with allspice berries, roasted coffee beans and added some amarena cherry syrup.
We poached the pears and vanilla in wine for the chardonnay and let it cool down - the other wines were just "married" with the other ingredients. Everything went then in plastic containers into the vacuum chamber, and Jowell the "chef de bar" vacuumed them 2 times.

After straining, we had some set backs: the melon grew significantly - a lot of wine went into the melon [but didn't went out again] - and the white wines both became cloudy. But why there was the amazing discovery of agar-agar clarification - if we never need to use it?

The red wines were both really amazing - deep ruby and rich - the merlot with more fragrance than taste like raspberries and only a hint of blueberries and vanilla. The cab was just super amazing - first you had hints of coffee, than a velvet spice carpet is getting over your palate and it finishes with just a little bit spice...

We added some additional sugar [the white wines got fructose, as it taste edgier] and the sauvignon blanc needed a bit citric acid to pop. Off course we added some more wine as well, to just make the procedure more efficient as well as keeping closer to the original wines.

Except of the cloudiness and the melon share [or should I say melon angel share?], it really surprised me, how well the drinks came out - and I even haven't tried them refrigerated and slightly carbonated...

Just amazing! 

We will serve it [as soon any obstacles in the supply and logistic chain are solved] in reusable swing-top bottles [0.25l] - and the guest can choose between a glass serve, or directly drinking it out of the bottle with a straw... lets be casual here...

The bad:

It is quite a lot of prep work, so it would be not easy for the bartenders to always do this - off course there is also the point of consistency - I need to watch over...

The good:

It is delicious.
And as it is so much prep work, not a lot of bars will do it - and it stays hopefully long exclusive with us @Skylite...


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How to use citric acid - and why you might not want to use it anyway!

To be honest, I shied away of this topic, because I think, people can misinterpret this - big time.


I don't want to be part of the problem - I want to be part of the solution! But when Chris, over at A Bar Above discussed this subject- I literally could not resist to join into "the discussion".

Here is the video:





I - however take a bit slower approach than Chris.
What is citric acid?
Chemical Compound
Citric acid is a weak organic acid with the formula C6H8O7. It is a natural preservative/conservative and is also used to add an acidic or sour taste to foods and drinks.
Wikipedia Formula: C6H8O7
Molar Mass: 192.124 g/mol
Melting Point: 153C
Density: 1.66 g/cm3
Boiling point: 175C
Soluble in: Water
Why is it controversial?
In my "mixology world" it is controversial, as citric acid is the stuff, which makes the nightmarish sour mix [preferably in powder form] sour. Yeah - citric acid is the main ingredient in one of the most controversial [and in the modern craft bartending wor…

The "perfect" Martini Extra Dry Cocktail

The Martini cocktail is one of the most disputed drink of all times - and one of the drink, which dramatically changed through the times - I would say, not to its disadvantage.

I shied from this topic a long time. It is just a mammoth of a topic with a lot of controversy. But what has to be done, has to be done!

Lets first of all understand, about what we are talking about:

We talking about the original Martini cocktail - which is gin based!
We are also touching the topic of Vodka Martinis - and maybe throw some understanding of the Vesper Martini in it.






We are not talking about things, which have only the glass in common to this substantial cocktail:

French martiniDiverse fruit martinis [melon, strawberry, apple, raspberry or any other audacity]Espresso martiniBreakfast martiniChocolate martiniCosmopolitan [sometimes impudently called Cosmo martini]Marteanis [or however you like to call it.Any other B*S* martini, showing up on some cocktail menus throughout the world.A drink which is …

The "perfect" Whiskey Sour

After the high popularity of my Mojito post - as well as the also well liked post about the Diablo, I would like to highlight here, another bar staple: The humble Whiskey Sour.

Also: if you can make a proper Whiskey Sour, you can do a lot of other Sours - basically you can take any distillate and make a Sour out of it...

I call it the "perfect" Whiskey Sour to be obviously a bit provocative - but also, as you get often a less than perfect drink, when you are ordering one.

So what are the ingredients of a Whiskey Sour?

American Whiskey [yes - I say it: definitely no Scotch, also for sure no Canadian, no Irish and obviously no Japanese]Truth has to be told - there is definitely something like an adequate Scotch Sour. But it should simply not be called Whiskey Sour, as the character is totally different. Period!Lemon JuiceSugarOptional egg white Additional to the ingredients, these features are also important to consider: Balance between sweet and sourIngredient proportionsA prope…