Skip to main content

Morgenthaler's Amaretto Sour

Jeffrey Morgenthaler stroke again with a brilliant video - this time it covers one of his last posts on his website - the Amaretto Sour [he calls it worlds best amaretto].


I have to say, that American bartenders tend to be a bit "self-centered".
He reads out of an American bar book - but let me tell you something - the Amaretto Sour is already quite some time around in Europe - and in Europe there was nothing such as "sweet & sour mix".
Traditionally lemon juice and in some cases sweeteners [most of the time simple syrup] used.
Admittedly - seldom in the era before the late 90's fresh lemon or lime juice was used - but still...

And I also don't get, where Jeffrey got it from, that the classic way in Europe is, to serve sours with an orange or lemon twist. Well nowadays maybe, but the "sour flag" with orange and/or lemon and maraschino cherry I have seen very often in Germany and other European countries [before of the mixology revolution].
I personally like an orange and lemon slice aligned with an amarena cherry [they are just fantastic - in texture, in taste... I am just looking further for stemmed amarena cherries, which would be the perfect solution].

Anyway - I would not call it an Amaretto Sour [as not US-centered European] I just simply call it the Morgenthaler's Amaretto Sour.

It is brilliant, to use high proof bourbon - I would not necessarily use Booker's - I am a fan of umping up a little bit the proportion of whiskey - however use a slightly less potent one - I love Knob Creek, as its toastiness is very nicely supporting the almond notes of the amaretto [yes - a lot of Amarettos don't even consist of almonds, but apricot seeds - however those have a very similar flavor].

I think also, that sugar syrup is not really necessary [I reduce though the amount of lemon]. Amaretto is already pretty sweet.

Anyway - it is a great variation of an Amaretto Sour. And I am carrying it for the moment on my beverage menu.

Thank you very much Jeffrey for your boldness and your creative intervention!

=====================
===================================
=====================

By the way - also a conventional Amaretto Sour can be a treat, if you are doing it right:

Amaretto Sour - the old way:

5 cl Amaretto
2 cl fresh lemon juice
1 cl orange juice
optional: 1.5 cl egg white [for those who don't mind the wet dog smell]

Pour all ingredients into a shaker filled with ice [optional dry shake]. Shake very strong and long. Strain into a pre chilled tumbler filled with ice cubes. Garnish.

This Amaretto Sour doesn't use any sugar syrup, however uses the orange juice as additional dilution [it also adds some sweet sourness to it]. It is not a strong drink, but definitely sufficient. There is not much to complain about - maybe even Mr. Morgenthaler should try [and enjoy] the simplified version.


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

How to use citric acid - and why you might not want to use it anyway!

To be honest, I shied away of this topic, because I think, people can misinterpret this - big time. I don't want to be part of the problem - I want to be part of the solution!  But when Chris, over at A Bar Above  discussed this subject- I literally could not resist to join into "the discussion". Here is the video: I - however take a bit slower approach than Chris. What is citric acid? Chemical Compound Citric acid is a weak organic acid with the formula C6H8O7. It is a natural preservative/conservative and is also used to add an acidic or sour taste to foods and drinks. Wikipedia Formula: C6H8O7 Molar Mass: 192.124 g/mol Melting Point: 153C Density: 1.66 g/cm3 Boiling point: 175C Soluble in: Water Why is it controversial? In my "mixology world" it is controversial, as citric acid is the stuff, which makes the nightmarish sour mix [ preferably in powder form ] sour. Yeah - citric acid is the main ingredient in one of the most

What is the best cranberry juice in the bar?

A good friend of me "whatsapp'ed" me today and asked for my expertise: "What is the best cranberry juice?" I would loved to just let him know the brand - however it is not that easy. What do we understand of cranberry juice? One of the biggest [maybe the  biggest producer] of cranberry products is Ocean Spray. And: it is well regarded. Problem is: it is not a juice! Wait - what? Ocean Spray doesn't produce a juice - they produce a juice cocktail - which translates into a lot of water, a lot of sugar, some taste-balancers as citric acid [nothing against this really] and a minuscule portion of juice - usually around 3%. Yes they have something which is called 100% juice. Which is on one hand true, on the other the biggest deception ever. Because you don't get 100% cranberry - you get a mixture of juices of concentrate - most of the time apple and white grape and a bit of cranberry. There are also some other brands around, which might feature a h

King Robert II Vodka

Who would knew, that I am reviewing a budget vodka here - on the opinionatedalchemist.com. But this isn't a normal review. I skip the marketing perception and use this product to cut directly to the case: Vodka is a "rather" neutral, colorless, "rather" flavorless and odorless distilled beverage from any agricultural source - and depending on the country, it has a minimum of 37.5% and 40% abv. As I said time and time again before: at times it is absolutely nonsense to talk about premium and luxury, when the original product doesn't really "hold this promise". Luxury water can have luxurious marketing, luxurious packaging, can be even rare and slightly more expensive "to produce". However really it is just water. Maybe it has some nuances to normal water - however those nuances (in a blind-test) are pretty small. Vodka is extremely similar - and the chain of evidence (despite a lot of people trying to proof otherwise) makes it re